Free
AOA Communication  |   February 2007
History Bureau's Third Essay Competition Encourages Exploring Profession's Past
Article Information
AOA Communication   |   February 2007
History Bureau's Third Essay Competition Encourages Exploring Profession's Past
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, February 2007, Vol. 107, 49-50. doi:10.7556/jaoa.2007.107.2.49
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, February 2007, Vol. 107, 49-50. doi:10.7556/jaoa.2007.107.2.49
Web of Science® Times Cited: 3
To entice osteopathic medical students, interns, and residents to study their profession's past struggles and achievements, the American Osteopathic Association's Bureau of Osteopathic History and Identity is conducting its third annual history essay competition. 
As it did in 2006, the bureau will bestow up to three awards: a $5000 first prize, a $3000 second prize, and a $2000 third prize. 
“In 2006, we increased the amount and number of prizes for the essay competition, and we were very pleased with the results,” says William T. Betz, DO, MBA, the chairman of the Bureau of Osteopathic History and Identity. “The number of contestants nearly doubled between 2005 and 2006. 
“More important, the bureau was extremely impressed with the overall quality of last year's submissions. In fact, the 2006 competition was an extremely close contest. After rating each of last year's essays, we discovered that only one rating point separated the first-, second-, and third-place winners. For me, that made awarding the prizes at the AOA's 2006 convention in Las Vegas all the more enjoyable.” 
Value of History
Created to support the AOA's Campaign for Osteopathic Unity, the history essay competition is designed to foster career-long loyalty to the osteopathic medical profession and its institutions, Dr Betz notes. 
“I am confident that as our 2007 contestants immerse themselves in the profession's rich past, they will be rewarded with a greater sense of what it means to be DOs and with a greater appreciation for why this profession needs to remain both distinct and united,” Dr Betz says. 
For decades, Irvin M. Korr, PhD, conducted pioneering basic science research exploring the relationships between somatic dysfunction and the nervous system. (Photo from the AOA photo archive)
For decades, Irvin M. Korr, PhD, conducted pioneering basic science research exploring the relationships between somatic dysfunction and the nervous system. (Photo from the AOA photo archive)
“When you study the overwhelming hardships that the first DOs and nearly every generation of DOs since have overcome, you can't help but realize how critical unity and loyalty have always been to our survival as a profession,” insists William G. Anderson, DO, the bureau's immediate past chairman and the AOA's first African-American president. “And when you look at the sacrifices our predecessors made so that we could practice medicine with all the privileges we take for granted today, you find yourself overflowing with pride and love for this profession.” 
Competition Details
The essay competition is open to all osteopathic medical students, interns, and residents. The deadline for submitting essays is Friday, June 1, 2007. 
While contestants can choose any topic on the history of the profession that they would like to explore, the history bureau recommends that contestants focus their papers on one of the 20 principles outlined in the bureau's “Core Principles for Teaching the History of Osteopathic Medicine” (see https://www.do-online.org/pdf/pub_do0207history.pdf for more information). 
The bureau recommends that contestants seek out faculty members with publishing experience to advise them on their essays. 
In drafting their essays, contestants should consult the guidelines for manuscript submissions to JAOA—The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association. Those guidelines are included in the JAOA's “Information for Contributors,” which appears in nearly every print issue of The Journal. “Information for Contributors” is also posted on the JAOA's Web site at http://www.jaoa.org/misc/ifora.shtml. 
Just as the JAOA does not set word limits on manuscript submissions, the history bureau is allowing contestants to write their essays to whatever length they believe is necessary to cover their topics. 
Women like Ann E. Perry, DO, were among the profession's most prominent early researchers. Dr Perry worked for a time with Louisa Burns, DO, at the A.T. Still Research Institute's clinical laboratories in California. (Photo from the AOA photo archive)
Women like Ann E. Perry, DO, were among the profession's most prominent early researchers. Dr Perry worked for a time with Louisa Burns, DO, at the A.T. Still Research Institute's clinical laboratories in California. (Photo from the AOA photo archive)
Peer-Reviewed Judging
As in the past 2 years, this year's entries will be judged in a peer-review setting by members of the Bureau of Osteopathic History and Identity. 
Depending on the quality and quantity of contest entries, the history bureau will award prizes to up to three authors. The bureau will determine the winning essays by late summer, in time for the winning authors to plan to attend the 112th Annual AOA Convention and Scientific Seminar, which will be held from September 30, 2007, to October 4, 2007, in San Diego, Calif. 
In addition to honoring the winners at the AOA convention, the history bureau will encourage all contestants to submit their essays to the JAOA. The essays of those contestants who do so will undergo The Journal's own peer-review process. 
“While the JAOA is not guaranteeing that it will publish the history competition's essays, just experiencing The Journal's peer-review process will be rewarding for the authors,” promises AOA Editor in Chief Gilbert E. D'Alonzo, Jr, DO. 
Last Year's Results
In 2006, 17 contestants entered the history bureau's essay competition compared with nine the year before. 
The following three contestants were honored during the House of Delegates' meeting that the Student Osteopathic Medical Association held during the AOA's 2006 convention: 
  • Rhett Papa, OMS II, from Oklahoma State University College of Osteopathic Medicine (OSU-COM) in Tulsa won the first-place award for an essay titled “Distinctiveness in Medical Treatment Between Osteopathic and Allopathic Medicine Creates a Competition That Drives the Advancement of Medicine”
  • Dustin Colegrove, OMS III, from OSU-COM took second place for an essay titled “Revisiting a Time When the Type of Medical Degree Made the Difference Between a Patient's Life or Death”
  • Dana M. Block, OMS IV, from Nova Southeastern University College of Osteopathic Medicine in Fort Lauderdale, Fla, won the third-place award for her entry titled “From Pulp Paper to Laptop Computer: A Reflection on Fundamental Osteopathic Philosophies”
Where to Submit
Osteopathic medical students, interns, and residents who wish to compete in the AOA's 2007 history essay competition should submit word-processed documents by June 1, 2007, to the AOA Bureau of Osteopathic History and Identity. 
Essays can be sent by e-mail to history@osteopathic.org. The subject line on e-mail messages should be “2007 History Essay Competition.” 
Alternatively, essays can be mailed to the Department of Publications, 2007 History Essay Competition, American Osteopathic Association, 142 E Ontario St, Chicago, IL 60611-2864. For mailed entries, essays should be placed on CD-ROMs or 3.5-inch floppy disks. 
Contestants with questions may call (800) 621-1773, extension 8157; send e-mail to history@osteopathic.org; or send faxes to (312) 202-8457. 
 Mr Fitzgerald is the director of the AOA Department of Publications.
 
 This article was first published in the February 2007 issue of The DO and will be republished periodically in the JAOA and The DO. The AOA Committee on Osteopathic History and Identity is recommending that essayists focus their papers on one of the 20 core principles found in “The Core Principles for Teaching the History of Osteopathic Medicine.” Additional instructions are provided in The DO magazine for osteopathic medical students, interns, and residents who plan to enter the committee's history essay contest. See http://www.do-online.org and click the Publications hyperlink under Advocacy in the navigation bar for more information.
 
For decades, Irvin M. Korr, PhD, conducted pioneering basic science research exploring the relationships between somatic dysfunction and the nervous system. (Photo from the AOA photo archive)
For decades, Irvin M. Korr, PhD, conducted pioneering basic science research exploring the relationships between somatic dysfunction and the nervous system. (Photo from the AOA photo archive)
Women like Ann E. Perry, DO, were among the profession's most prominent early researchers. Dr Perry worked for a time with Louisa Burns, DO, at the A.T. Still Research Institute's clinical laboratories in California. (Photo from the AOA photo archive)
Women like Ann E. Perry, DO, were among the profession's most prominent early researchers. Dr Perry worked for a time with Louisa Burns, DO, at the A.T. Still Research Institute's clinical laboratories in California. (Photo from the AOA photo archive)