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Student Contribution  |   January 2005
Patency and Obliteration of the Cranial Sutures: Is There a Clinical Significance?
Article Information
Neuromusculoskeletal Disorders
Student Contribution   |   January 2005
Patency and Obliteration of the Cranial Sutures: Is There a Clinical Significance?
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, January 2005, Vol. 105, 25. doi:10.7556/jaoa.2005.105.1.25
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, January 2005, Vol. 105, 25. doi:10.7556/jaoa.2005.105.1.25
Web of Science® Times Cited: 3
Previous research on cranial sutures has placed great emphasis on correlating age with timing of sutural fusion and little dedication to evaluating the relation of sutural patency with clinical relevance. The external morphology of the coronal, sagittal and occipital sutures was evaluated in thirty-six human cadaver skulls. Each suture was described using a modified grading scale to quantify the extent of sutural patency and obliteration. Two significant findings were observed: (1) the lambdoid suture was overall most likely to be patent and least likely to be obliterated, and (2) the sagittal suture was most likely to be obliterated and least likely to be patent when compared to the other sutures. These findings provide an insight into understanding what external forces cause cranial sutures to be more patent than others. In turn, it can help determine if they have a clinical significance beyond the estimation of age.