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Original Contribution  |   September 2003
Productivity outcomes for recent grants and fellowships awarded by the American Osteopathic Association Bureau of Research
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Professional Issues
Original Contribution   |   September 2003
Productivity outcomes for recent grants and fellowships awarded by the American Osteopathic Association Bureau of Research
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, September 2003, Vol. 103, 435-440. doi:10.7556/jaoa.2003.103.9.435
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, September 2003, Vol. 103, 435-440. doi:10.7556/jaoa.2003.103.9.435
Abstract

The objective of the present study was to evaluate productivity outcome measures for recent research grants and fellowships awarded through the American Osteopathic Association (AOA) Bureau of Research. Recipients of grants and fellowships that were awarded between 1995 and 2001 were contacted by mail, e-mail, or telephone and asked to provide information about publications, resulting grant awards, advances in clinical care, or other notable products that were generated from their projects. For grants funded between 1995 and 1998, 76% of principal investigators reported a notable product from their study. By contrast, for grants funded between 1999 and 2001, only 31% reported a notable outcome. This difference most likely can be attributed to the lag time between the awarding of a grant and actual completion of the project, the processing of the data, and the publication of the results. Several recipients of 1999-2001 grants were optimistic about eventually generating a notable product. Most (79%) of the 1995-2001 fellows met the requirements for successful completion of their project. Many fellows exceeded the minimal requirement by publishing their results, continuing research activity, attracting extramural grant monies, or entering an academic position. It appeared that a much larger proportion of osteopathic fellows went on to academic careers than their counterparts who did not have fellowship training. From 1995 to 2001, the AOA Bureau of Research awarded dollars 3,072,140 in research grants and fellowships. To date, these awards have helped the recipients bring an additional dollars 5,659,329 of extramural funds for research at osteopathic institutions. The Bureau of Research grant and fellowship programs have been successful both scientifically and in terms of financial outcomes.