Free
Medical Education  |   November 2004
Undergraduate Osteopathic Medical Education
Author Notes
  • Correspondence to Ms Susan Sweet, Director, Division of Predoctoral Education, AOA Department of Accreditation, 142 E Ontario St, Chicago, IL 60611-2864. E-mail: ssweet@osteopathic.org. 
Article Information
Medical Education
Medical Education   |   November 2004
Undergraduate Osteopathic Medical Education
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, November 2004, Vol. 104, 460-467. doi:10.7556/jaoa.2004.104.11.460
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, November 2004, Vol. 104, 460-467. doi:10.7556/jaoa.2004.104.11.460
This article presents basic data about the 20 colleges of osteopathic medicine for the 2003–2004 academic year. Information in this article has been adapted from the American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine (AACOM)/American Osteopathic Association (AOA) Annual Osteopathic Medical School Questionnaire for the 2003–2004 academic year, fiscal year (FY) 2002, and the 2004–2005 AACOM Tuition Survey. In addition, the draft of the AACOM's 2003 Annual Statistical Report and its historical database compiled from previous surveys have been used to prepare this article. 
Osteopathic Medical Student Applicants
For the second consecutive year, the number of applications has increased, represented by a 5.8% growth between 2003 and 2004 (Figure 1). Even with this slight increase in the number of applicants for 2004, however, the overall numbers continue to be considerably lower than the high point in 1997 (10,764). Since 1999 (8396), the total number of applicants has decreased by 14% (Table 1). 
Figure 1.
Figure 1.
Table 1
Applicants to Osteopathic Medical Schools Participating in the American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine Application Service (AACOMAS)-Ethnic Groups and Women by Entering Year *
Group 1999 2000 * 2001 2002 2003 2004
□ Black378414335342358404
□ Hispanic342343290287314350
□ Native American 70
72
68
55
60
63
Total Underrepresented Minority 790 829 693 684 732 817
Percent Underrepresented Minority 9.9 10.8 10.0 10.8 10.7 11.3
□ White; non-Hispanic558350994731428545674725
□ Asian/Pacific Islander159213461226108612011357
□ Other and Unknown431434248269314341
Total All Groups 8396 7708 7259 6324 6813 7240
□ No. of Women Among Total Applicants351834023151305833483638
□ Percent Women41.944.145.748.449.150.2
□ No. of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine Participating in AACOMAS191918181919
 Source: AACOMAS, American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine Application Service.
 *Data from the University of North Texas Health Sciences Center/Texas College of Osteopathic Medicine (UNTHSC/TCOM) is not included after 2000 as those applications are processed through the Texas Statewide Application Service.
 The Edward Via Virginia College of Osteopathic Medicine at Blacksburg, Va, began participating in AACOMAS in 2003 and admitted its first class that year.
 This table includes applicants processed by AACOMAS, but does not include those applicants who may have applied directly to the schools. For the 2003 entering class, the schools received 1491 direct applications, with 1350 of these at the University of North Texas Health Science Center at Fort Worth. Other schools receiving direct applications in 2003 are Des Moines University, College of Osteopathic Medicine (19), Kansas City University of Medicine and Biosciences-College of Osteopathic Medicine (6), Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine (4), New York College of Osteopathic Medicine of New York Institute of Technology (109), and Edward Via College of Osteopathic Medicine (3). Non-AACOMAS applicant data for 2004 are not yet available.
Table 1
Applicants to Osteopathic Medical Schools Participating in the American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine Application Service (AACOMAS)-Ethnic Groups and Women by Entering Year *
Group 1999 2000 * 2001 2002 2003 2004
□ Black378414335342358404
□ Hispanic342343290287314350
□ Native American 70
72
68
55
60
63
Total Underrepresented Minority 790 829 693 684 732 817
Percent Underrepresented Minority 9.9 10.8 10.0 10.8 10.7 11.3
□ White; non-Hispanic558350994731428545674725
□ Asian/Pacific Islander159213461226108612011357
□ Other and Unknown431434248269314341
Total All Groups 8396 7708 7259 6324 6813 7240
□ No. of Women Among Total Applicants351834023151305833483638
□ Percent Women41.944.145.748.449.150.2
□ No. of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine Participating in AACOMAS191918181919
 Source: AACOMAS, American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine Application Service.
 *Data from the University of North Texas Health Sciences Center/Texas College of Osteopathic Medicine (UNTHSC/TCOM) is not included after 2000 as those applications are processed through the Texas Statewide Application Service.
 The Edward Via Virginia College of Osteopathic Medicine at Blacksburg, Va, began participating in AACOMAS in 2003 and admitted its first class that year.
 This table includes applicants processed by AACOMAS, but does not include those applicants who may have applied directly to the schools. For the 2003 entering class, the schools received 1491 direct applications, with 1350 of these at the University of North Texas Health Science Center at Fort Worth. Other schools receiving direct applications in 2003 are Des Moines University, College of Osteopathic Medicine (19), Kansas City University of Medicine and Biosciences-College of Osteopathic Medicine (6), Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine (4), New York College of Osteopathic Medicine of New York Institute of Technology (109), and Edward Via College of Osteopathic Medicine (3). Non-AACOMAS applicant data for 2004 are not yet available.
×
After its peak in 1997, the number of underrepresented minority applicants has steadily decreased. In 1998, 936 individuals of underrepresented minorities applied to the 19 colleges of osteopathic medicine, and that number dropped further in 1999 to 790 before rebounding to 829 in 2000. The decline in underrepresented minority applicants continued through 2001 and 2002 to 693 and 684, respectively; however, this number rebounded again to 732 in 2003 and 817 in 2004. Between 1999 and 2004, the number of underrepresented minority applicants declined by just 3%, but the number of underrepresented minority applicants increased by 11.6% between 2003 and 2004. 
In the 2003–2004 academic year, the five colleges with the most applications received were the Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine (PCOM); New York College of Osteopathic Medicine of New York Institute of Technology (NYCOM); Midwestern University/Chicago College of Osteopathic Medicine (MWU/CCOM); A. T. Still University of Health Sciences/Kirksville College of Osteopathic Medicine (ATSU/KCOM); and Des Moines University–College of Osteopathic Medicine (DMU-COM). These five schools—as well as most of the other 15 colleges of osteopathic medicine—had an increase in the number of applications for the 2003–2004 academic year. Only three colleges of osteopathic medicine had a decrease in the number of applications for the 2003 entering classes (Table 2). 
Table 2
Number of Applications Received, First-Year Enrollment, and Total Enrollment by College
No. of Applications First-Year Enrollment Total Enrollment
College*
2002-2003
2003-2004
2002-2003
2003-2004
2002-2003
2003-2004
ATSU/KCOM2,2492,441165170631626
DMU-COM2,0702,180216204802795
KCUMB-COM2,0422,103228232887901
LECOM2,0932,076223227721806
MSUCOM1,6211,609124143527533
MWU/AzCOM1,9002,090154147546547
MWU/CCOM2,4522,747172188643664
NSUCOM1,9772,059188214757769
NYCOM2,5692,8083333121,1471,161
OSU-COM1,0591,1629090348350
OU-COM1,9182,041114114432428
PCOM3,1543,3962662641,0131,011
PCSOM1,2641,3346575251253
TUCOM1,8051,942130141443490
UMDNJ-SOM1,5641,7379096327352
UNECOM1,9031,867131124468488
UNTHSC/TCOM1,1591,350127129479492
VCOM§NA//660NA154NA154
WesternU/COMP1,9361,994182181702700
WVSOM 1,372
1,432
81
103
308
337
Total 36,107 39,028 3,079 3,308 11,432 11,857
 Source: American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine/American Osteopathic Association, Annual Osteopathic Medical School Questionnaire, 2003-2004 academic year.
 *Full names of colleges with abbreviations appear in the Appendix.
 Because most applicants apply to several schools, the number of applications shown in this table is significantly higher than the number of individual applicants shown in Table 1.
 New York College of Osteopathic Medicine's data include the Accelerated Program for Émigré Physicians (APEP) students.
 §The Edward Via Virginia College of Osteopathic Medicine admitted its first class in Fall 2003.
 //NA indicates not available.
Table 2
Number of Applications Received, First-Year Enrollment, and Total Enrollment by College
No. of Applications First-Year Enrollment Total Enrollment
College*
2002-2003
2003-2004
2002-2003
2003-2004
2002-2003
2003-2004
ATSU/KCOM2,2492,441165170631626
DMU-COM2,0702,180216204802795
KCUMB-COM2,0422,103228232887901
LECOM2,0932,076223227721806
MSUCOM1,6211,609124143527533
MWU/AzCOM1,9002,090154147546547
MWU/CCOM2,4522,747172188643664
NSUCOM1,9772,059188214757769
NYCOM2,5692,8083333121,1471,161
OSU-COM1,0591,1629090348350
OU-COM1,9182,041114114432428
PCOM3,1543,3962662641,0131,011
PCSOM1,2641,3346575251253
TUCOM1,8051,942130141443490
UMDNJ-SOM1,5641,7379096327352
UNECOM1,9031,867131124468488
UNTHSC/TCOM1,1591,350127129479492
VCOM§NA//660NA154NA154
WesternU/COMP1,9361,994182181702700
WVSOM 1,372
1,432
81
103
308
337
Total 36,107 39,028 3,079 3,308 11,432 11,857
 Source: American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine/American Osteopathic Association, Annual Osteopathic Medical School Questionnaire, 2003-2004 academic year.
 *Full names of colleges with abbreviations appear in the Appendix.
 Because most applicants apply to several schools, the number of applications shown in this table is significantly higher than the number of individual applicants shown in Table 1.
 New York College of Osteopathic Medicine's data include the Accelerated Program for Émigré Physicians (APEP) students.
 §The Edward Via Virginia College of Osteopathic Medicine admitted its first class in Fall 2003.
 //NA indicates not available.
×
Enrollment
First-year enrollment continues to increase. The first-year enrollment in the 2003–2004 academic year was 3308, an increase of 229 students (Figure 2). 
Figure 2.
Figure 2.
The percentage of ethnic minority students rose again in 2002–2003. Ethnic minorities (Black, Hispanic, and Native American students) represent 7.8% and Asian/Pacific Islander students represent 15.4% of the total enrollment in the 2003–2004 academic year (Table 3). 
Table 3
Total Enrollment and Percentage of Minority Ethnic Groups By College
Underrepresented Ethnic Minority Asian/Pacific Islander Total Ethmic Minority
College*
Total Enrollment
No.
Percent of Total Enrollment
No.
Percent of Total Enrollment
No.
Percent of Total Enrollment
ATSU/KCOM626121.97411.88613.7
DMU-COM795384.8354.4739.2
KCUMB-COM901515.7889.813915.4
LECOM806293.69812.212715.8
MSUCOM533285.36311.89117.1
MWU/AzCOM547152.75910.87413.5
MWU/CCOM664263.911917.914521.8
NSUCOM76911915.512916.824832.2
NYCOM1,16117114.732628.149742.8
OSU-COM3505315.1174.97020.0
OU-COM4286314.7307.09321.7
PCOM1,011919.010510.419619.4
PCSOM253104.0104.0207.9
TUCOM49091.811022.411924.3
UMDNJ-SOM3528925.38223.317148.6
UNECOM48861.2377.6438.8
UNTHSC/TCOM492438.712625.616934.3
VCOM§1541610.41711.03321.4
WesternU/COMP700537.627439.132746.7
WVSOM 337
4
1.2
23
6.8
27
8.0
All Colleges 11,857 926 7.8 1,822 15.4 2,748 32.2
 Source: American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine/American Osteopathic Association, Annual Osteopathic Medical School Questionnaire, 2003-2004 academic year.
 *Full names of colleges with abbreviations appear in the Appendix.
 These percentages are based on total enrollment. Percentages may not add across because of rounding.
 New York College of Osteopathic Medicine's data include the Accelerated Program for Émigé, Physicians (APEP) students
 §The Edward Via Virginia College of Osteopathic Medicine admitted its first class in Fall 2003
Table 3
Total Enrollment and Percentage of Minority Ethnic Groups By College
Underrepresented Ethnic Minority Asian/Pacific Islander Total Ethmic Minority
College*
Total Enrollment
No.
Percent of Total Enrollment
No.
Percent of Total Enrollment
No.
Percent of Total Enrollment
ATSU/KCOM626121.97411.88613.7
DMU-COM795384.8354.4739.2
KCUMB-COM901515.7889.813915.4
LECOM806293.69812.212715.8
MSUCOM533285.36311.89117.1
MWU/AzCOM547152.75910.87413.5
MWU/CCOM664263.911917.914521.8
NSUCOM76911915.512916.824832.2
NYCOM1,16117114.732628.149742.8
OSU-COM3505315.1174.97020.0
OU-COM4286314.7307.09321.7
PCOM1,011919.010510.419619.4
PCSOM253104.0104.0207.9
TUCOM49091.811022.411924.3
UMDNJ-SOM3528925.38223.317148.6
UNECOM48861.2377.6438.8
UNTHSC/TCOM492438.712625.616934.3
VCOM§1541610.41711.03321.4
WesternU/COMP700537.627439.132746.7
WVSOM 337
4
1.2
23
6.8
27
8.0
All Colleges 11,857 926 7.8 1,822 15.4 2,748 32.2
 Source: American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine/American Osteopathic Association, Annual Osteopathic Medical School Questionnaire, 2003-2004 academic year.
 *Full names of colleges with abbreviations appear in the Appendix.
 These percentages are based on total enrollment. Percentages may not add across because of rounding.
 New York College of Osteopathic Medicine's data include the Accelerated Program for Émigé, Physicians (APEP) students
 §The Edward Via Virginia College of Osteopathic Medicine admitted its first class in Fall 2003
×
The number of female osteopathic medical students enrolled at the colleges of osteopathic medicine continues to increase. For the 2003–2004 academic year, 46.9% of all students were female. The total number of women enrolled in 2003–2004 was 5557 (Table 4). 
Table 4
Total Enrollment and Enrollment of Women at Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine
Total Enrollment
Entering Year
Total
Women No. (%)
19948,1462,870 (35.2)
19958,4753,075 (36.3)
1996*8,9613,308 (36.9)
19979,4343,591 (38.1)
19989,8823,862 (39.1)
199910,3884,181 (40.2)
200010,8174,443 (41.1)
200111,1034,781 (43.1)
200211,4325,099 (44.6)
200311,8575,557 (49.9)
 Source: American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine/American Osteopathic Association, Annual Osteopathic Medical School Questionnaire, 2003-2004 academic year.
 *Data include the Accelerated Program for Émigré Physicians (APEP) at New York College of Osteopathic Medicine of New York Institute of Medicine and Midwestern University/Arizona College of Osteopathic Medicine's first class of 103, including 33 women.
 Data include Pikeville College School of Osteopathic Medicine and Touro University College of Osteopathic Medicine's first classes of 60 students (14 women) and 66 students (26 women), respectively.
 Data include Edward Via College of Osteopathic Medicine's first class of 154 students, including 74 women.
Table 4
Total Enrollment and Enrollment of Women at Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine
Total Enrollment
Entering Year
Total
Women No. (%)
19948,1462,870 (35.2)
19958,4753,075 (36.3)
1996*8,9613,308 (36.9)
19979,4343,591 (38.1)
19989,8823,862 (39.1)
199910,3884,181 (40.2)
200010,8174,443 (41.1)
200111,1034,781 (43.1)
200211,4325,099 (44.6)
200311,8575,557 (49.9)
 Source: American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine/American Osteopathic Association, Annual Osteopathic Medical School Questionnaire, 2003-2004 academic year.
 *Data include the Accelerated Program for Émigré Physicians (APEP) at New York College of Osteopathic Medicine of New York Institute of Medicine and Midwestern University/Arizona College of Osteopathic Medicine's first class of 103, including 33 women.
 Data include Pikeville College School of Osteopathic Medicine and Touro University College of Osteopathic Medicine's first classes of 60 students (14 women) and 66 students (26 women), respectively.
 Data include Edward Via College of Osteopathic Medicine's first class of 154 students, including 74 women.
×
Geographic Source of First-Year Students
For the first time, more than half of all first-year osteopathic medical students seek medical education outside their home state. Of the 3308 first-year students enrolled at the 20 colleges of osteopathic medicine during the 2003–2004 academic year, 47.8% were residents of the state in which the college of osteopathic medicine is located and 51.5% were nonresidents. During the 2002–2003 academic year, 1590 (51.6%) of the first-year students were from the state in which the college of osteopathic medicine is located. 
The University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey–School of Osteopathic Medicine (UMDNJ-SOM) and the University of North Texas Health Science Center of Fort Worth—Texas College of Osteopathic Medicine (UNTHSC/TCOM) had the highest percentages (97.9% and 96.1%, respectively) of in-state students for the 2003–2004 academic year. Kansas City University of Medicine and Biosciences–College of Osteopathic Medicine (KCUMB-COM) and the University of New England College of Osteopathic Medicine (UNECOM) had the highest percentage of out-of-state students for the 2003–2004 academic year, 86.6% and 83.1%, respectively (Table 5). Because of special funding relationships with the states, public colleges generally admit a much higher proportion of state residents than do private schools. 
Table 5
Number of State Residents and Nonresidents Enrolled in First Year by College
2002-2003 2003-2004
College*
No. of Residents
No. of Nonresidents
Total No.
No. of Residents
No. of Nonresidents
No. of Foreign Students
Total No.
ATSU/KCOM26139165281393170
DMU-COM52164216401640204
KCUMB-COM28200228292012232
LECOM78145223631640227
MSUCOM1195124132110143
MWU/AzCOM45109154401070147
MWU/CCOM7696172691190188
NSUCOM9791188117916214
NYCOM2071263331961151312
OSU-COM771390846090
OU-COM932111495190114
PCOM177892661491132264
PCSOM2738653342075
TUCOM666413056850141
UMDNJ-SOM83790942096
UNECOM25106131181033124
UNTHSC/TCOM123412712450129
VCOMNANANA441091154
WesternU/COMP14042182121555181
WVSOM 51
30
81
50
53
0
103
Total 1590 1489 3079 1582 1703 23 3308
 Source: American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine/American Osteopathic Association, Annual Osteopathic Medical School Questionnaire, 2003-2004 academic year.
 *Full names of colleges with abbreviations appear in the Appendix.
 Data for New York College of Osteopathic Medicine of New York Institute ot Technology includes the Accelerated Program for Émigré Physicians (APEP) students.
 NA indicates not available.
Table 5
Number of State Residents and Nonresidents Enrolled in First Year by College
2002-2003 2003-2004
College*
No. of Residents
No. of Nonresidents
Total No.
No. of Residents
No. of Nonresidents
No. of Foreign Students
Total No.
ATSU/KCOM26139165281393170
DMU-COM52164216401640204
KCUMB-COM28200228292012232
LECOM78145223631640227
MSUCOM1195124132110143
MWU/AzCOM45109154401070147
MWU/CCOM7696172691190188
NSUCOM9791188117916214
NYCOM2071263331961151312
OSU-COM771390846090
OU-COM932111495190114
PCOM177892661491132264
PCSOM2738653342075
TUCOM666413056850141
UMDNJ-SOM83790942096
UNECOM25106131181033124
UNTHSC/TCOM123412712450129
VCOMNANANA441091154
WesternU/COMP14042182121555181
WVSOM 51
30
81
50
53
0
103
Total 1590 1489 3079 1582 1703 23 3308
 Source: American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine/American Osteopathic Association, Annual Osteopathic Medical School Questionnaire, 2003-2004 academic year.
 *Full names of colleges with abbreviations appear in the Appendix.
 Data for New York College of Osteopathic Medicine of New York Institute ot Technology includes the Accelerated Program for Émigré Physicians (APEP) students.
 NA indicates not available.
×
College Record of Freshmen
Freshmen entering the 2003–2004 academic year had a mean grade point average (GPA) of 3.45, which is slightly higher than the mean GPA of the 2002–2003 academic year (3.43). Mean MCAT scores for these freshman were as follows: biological sciences, 8.51; physical sciences, 7.77; and verbal reasoning, 8.07. 
Faculty
The 20 colleges of osteopathic medicine had 12,726 faculty members in 2003–2004, including full-time, part-time, and volunteer faculty. Most full-time and part-time faculty serving the colleges of osteopathic medicine (86%) teach clinical sciences, and the remainder teaches preclinical sciences (5.1%). 
In the 2003–2004 academic year, approximately 80.6% of the faculty at the 20 colleges of osteopathic medicine were volunteer faculty. The largest percentage of full-time and part-time academicians teach general practice/family practice (Table 6). 
Table 6
Full-time Faculty Assignments by Discipline
Percent of Faculty Assigned *
Discipline
2002-2003
2003-2004
□ Anatomy7.87.8
□ Biochemistry4.64.8
□ Emergency Medicine0.6
□ General Practice/Family Practice17.217.5
□ Geriatrics2.22.2
□ Internal Medicine10.310.8
□ Microbiology5.95.2
□ Neurology1.11.3
□ Obstetrics/Gynecology3.32.9
□ Osteopathic Principles & Practice5.04.3
□ Pathology3.22.9
□ Pediatrics3.63.7
□ Pharmacology4.74.1
□ Physical Medicine/Rehabilitation Medicine0.91.2
□ Physiology4.94.6
□ Preventive Medicine/Public Health2.62.4
□ Psychiatry5.25.3
□ Radiology1.11.5
□ Surgery (General)3.43.6
□ Other12.413.8
 Source: American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine/American Osteopathic Association, Annual Osteopathic Medical School Questionnaire, 2003-2004 academic year.
 *Percentages may not add to 100% because of rounding.
 Now reported under “Other”.
 Includes anesthesiology, dermatology, emergency medicine, ophthalmology, orthopedic surgery, otolaryngology, and urology.
Table 6
Full-time Faculty Assignments by Discipline
Percent of Faculty Assigned *
Discipline
2002-2003
2003-2004
□ Anatomy7.87.8
□ Biochemistry4.64.8
□ Emergency Medicine0.6
□ General Practice/Family Practice17.217.5
□ Geriatrics2.22.2
□ Internal Medicine10.310.8
□ Microbiology5.95.2
□ Neurology1.11.3
□ Obstetrics/Gynecology3.32.9
□ Osteopathic Principles & Practice5.04.3
□ Pathology3.22.9
□ Pediatrics3.63.7
□ Pharmacology4.74.1
□ Physical Medicine/Rehabilitation Medicine0.91.2
□ Physiology4.94.6
□ Preventive Medicine/Public Health2.62.4
□ Psychiatry5.25.3
□ Radiology1.11.5
□ Surgery (General)3.43.6
□ Other12.413.8
 Source: American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine/American Osteopathic Association, Annual Osteopathic Medical School Questionnaire, 2003-2004 academic year.
 *Percentages may not add to 100% because of rounding.
 Now reported under “Other”.
 Includes anesthesiology, dermatology, emergency medicine, ophthalmology, orthopedic surgery, otolaryngology, and urology.
×
Tuition
For the academic year beginning in 2004–2005, tuition is expected to average $16,481 for in-state residents in public schools and $30,192 in private schools. For out-of-state residents, tuition averages $32,610 in public schools and $31,101 in private schools (Table 7). 
Table 7
Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine Tuition (Subject to Change)
Tuition
College*
State Residents
Nonresidents
Private
ATSU/KCOM$31,700$31,700
DMU-COM$29,050$29,050
KCUMB-COM$33,247$33,247
LECOM$24,100$25,100
MWU/AzCOM$34,099$34,099
MWU/CCOM$29,755$35,391
NSUCOM$23,267$29,358
NYCOM$31,749$31,749
PCOM$32,334$32,334
PCSOM$27,000$27,000
TUCOM$30,650$30,650
UNECOM$33,000$33,000
VCOM$29,500$29,500
WesternU/COMP$33,230$33,230
Mean $30,192 $31,101

Public
MSUCOM$20,900$44,700
OSU-COM$14,995$30,144
OU-COM$19,455$28,353
UMDNJ-SOM$20,567$32,185
UNTHSC/TCOM$ 6,550$19,650
WVSOM$16,418$40,630
Mean
$16,481 $32,610
 Source: American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine, Tuition Survey for 2004-05.
 *Full names of colleges with abbreviations appear in the Appendix.
Table 7
Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine Tuition (Subject to Change)
Tuition
College*
State Residents
Nonresidents
Private
ATSU/KCOM$31,700$31,700
DMU-COM$29,050$29,050
KCUMB-COM$33,247$33,247
LECOM$24,100$25,100
MWU/AzCOM$34,099$34,099
MWU/CCOM$29,755$35,391
NSUCOM$23,267$29,358
NYCOM$31,749$31,749
PCOM$32,334$32,334
PCSOM$27,000$27,000
TUCOM$30,650$30,650
UNECOM$33,000$33,000
VCOM$29,500$29,500
WesternU/COMP$33,230$33,230
Mean $30,192 $31,101

Public
MSUCOM$20,900$44,700
OSU-COM$14,995$30,144
OU-COM$19,455$28,353
UMDNJ-SOM$20,567$32,185
UNTHSC/TCOM$ 6,550$19,650
WVSOM$16,418$40,630
Mean
$16,481 $32,610
 Source: American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine, Tuition Survey for 2004-05.
 *Full names of colleges with abbreviations appear in the Appendix.
×
Income and Expenditures of Osteopathic Medical Colleges
The 20 colleges of osteopathic medicine reported total revenue of $809,862,891 in FY 2003, which constitutes a 3.9% increase from 2002 ($778,900,000). As in the past, tuition contributes substantially more to total revenues in the private schools than it does in the public schools, which draw more heavily from state subsidies. 
Students benefit from state government funding, which continues to play an important role in the fiscal health of osteopathic medical education. The Armed Forces also continues to be a significant source of funds to students and their schools through the Armed Forces Health Professions Scholarship Program. 
Total expenditures in FY 2003 were approximately $743,903,417, an increase of 3.2% from FY 2002 ($720,400,000). Instruction continues to account for the largest portion of expenditures. 
Figure 1.
Figure 1.
Figure 2.
Figure 2.
Table 1
Applicants to Osteopathic Medical Schools Participating in the American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine Application Service (AACOMAS)-Ethnic Groups and Women by Entering Year *
Group 1999 2000 * 2001 2002 2003 2004
□ Black378414335342358404
□ Hispanic342343290287314350
□ Native American 70
72
68
55
60
63
Total Underrepresented Minority 790 829 693 684 732 817
Percent Underrepresented Minority 9.9 10.8 10.0 10.8 10.7 11.3
□ White; non-Hispanic558350994731428545674725
□ Asian/Pacific Islander159213461226108612011357
□ Other and Unknown431434248269314341
Total All Groups 8396 7708 7259 6324 6813 7240
□ No. of Women Among Total Applicants351834023151305833483638
□ Percent Women41.944.145.748.449.150.2
□ No. of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine Participating in AACOMAS191918181919
 Source: AACOMAS, American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine Application Service.
 *Data from the University of North Texas Health Sciences Center/Texas College of Osteopathic Medicine (UNTHSC/TCOM) is not included after 2000 as those applications are processed through the Texas Statewide Application Service.
 The Edward Via Virginia College of Osteopathic Medicine at Blacksburg, Va, began participating in AACOMAS in 2003 and admitted its first class that year.
 This table includes applicants processed by AACOMAS, but does not include those applicants who may have applied directly to the schools. For the 2003 entering class, the schools received 1491 direct applications, with 1350 of these at the University of North Texas Health Science Center at Fort Worth. Other schools receiving direct applications in 2003 are Des Moines University, College of Osteopathic Medicine (19), Kansas City University of Medicine and Biosciences-College of Osteopathic Medicine (6), Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine (4), New York College of Osteopathic Medicine of New York Institute of Technology (109), and Edward Via College of Osteopathic Medicine (3). Non-AACOMAS applicant data for 2004 are not yet available.
Table 1
Applicants to Osteopathic Medical Schools Participating in the American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine Application Service (AACOMAS)-Ethnic Groups and Women by Entering Year *
Group 1999 2000 * 2001 2002 2003 2004
□ Black378414335342358404
□ Hispanic342343290287314350
□ Native American 70
72
68
55
60
63
Total Underrepresented Minority 790 829 693 684 732 817
Percent Underrepresented Minority 9.9 10.8 10.0 10.8 10.7 11.3
□ White; non-Hispanic558350994731428545674725
□ Asian/Pacific Islander159213461226108612011357
□ Other and Unknown431434248269314341
Total All Groups 8396 7708 7259 6324 6813 7240
□ No. of Women Among Total Applicants351834023151305833483638
□ Percent Women41.944.145.748.449.150.2
□ No. of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine Participating in AACOMAS191918181919
 Source: AACOMAS, American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine Application Service.
 *Data from the University of North Texas Health Sciences Center/Texas College of Osteopathic Medicine (UNTHSC/TCOM) is not included after 2000 as those applications are processed through the Texas Statewide Application Service.
 The Edward Via Virginia College of Osteopathic Medicine at Blacksburg, Va, began participating in AACOMAS in 2003 and admitted its first class that year.
 This table includes applicants processed by AACOMAS, but does not include those applicants who may have applied directly to the schools. For the 2003 entering class, the schools received 1491 direct applications, with 1350 of these at the University of North Texas Health Science Center at Fort Worth. Other schools receiving direct applications in 2003 are Des Moines University, College of Osteopathic Medicine (19), Kansas City University of Medicine and Biosciences-College of Osteopathic Medicine (6), Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine (4), New York College of Osteopathic Medicine of New York Institute of Technology (109), and Edward Via College of Osteopathic Medicine (3). Non-AACOMAS applicant data for 2004 are not yet available.
×
Table 2
Number of Applications Received, First-Year Enrollment, and Total Enrollment by College
No. of Applications First-Year Enrollment Total Enrollment
College*
2002-2003
2003-2004
2002-2003
2003-2004
2002-2003
2003-2004
ATSU/KCOM2,2492,441165170631626
DMU-COM2,0702,180216204802795
KCUMB-COM2,0422,103228232887901
LECOM2,0932,076223227721806
MSUCOM1,6211,609124143527533
MWU/AzCOM1,9002,090154147546547
MWU/CCOM2,4522,747172188643664
NSUCOM1,9772,059188214757769
NYCOM2,5692,8083333121,1471,161
OSU-COM1,0591,1629090348350
OU-COM1,9182,041114114432428
PCOM3,1543,3962662641,0131,011
PCSOM1,2641,3346575251253
TUCOM1,8051,942130141443490
UMDNJ-SOM1,5641,7379096327352
UNECOM1,9031,867131124468488
UNTHSC/TCOM1,1591,350127129479492
VCOM§NA//660NA154NA154
WesternU/COMP1,9361,994182181702700
WVSOM 1,372
1,432
81
103
308
337
Total 36,107 39,028 3,079 3,308 11,432 11,857
 Source: American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine/American Osteopathic Association, Annual Osteopathic Medical School Questionnaire, 2003-2004 academic year.
 *Full names of colleges with abbreviations appear in the Appendix.
 Because most applicants apply to several schools, the number of applications shown in this table is significantly higher than the number of individual applicants shown in Table 1.
 New York College of Osteopathic Medicine's data include the Accelerated Program for Émigré Physicians (APEP) students.
 §The Edward Via Virginia College of Osteopathic Medicine admitted its first class in Fall 2003.
 //NA indicates not available.
Table 2
Number of Applications Received, First-Year Enrollment, and Total Enrollment by College
No. of Applications First-Year Enrollment Total Enrollment
College*
2002-2003
2003-2004
2002-2003
2003-2004
2002-2003
2003-2004
ATSU/KCOM2,2492,441165170631626
DMU-COM2,0702,180216204802795
KCUMB-COM2,0422,103228232887901
LECOM2,0932,076223227721806
MSUCOM1,6211,609124143527533
MWU/AzCOM1,9002,090154147546547
MWU/CCOM2,4522,747172188643664
NSUCOM1,9772,059188214757769
NYCOM2,5692,8083333121,1471,161
OSU-COM1,0591,1629090348350
OU-COM1,9182,041114114432428
PCOM3,1543,3962662641,0131,011
PCSOM1,2641,3346575251253
TUCOM1,8051,942130141443490
UMDNJ-SOM1,5641,7379096327352
UNECOM1,9031,867131124468488
UNTHSC/TCOM1,1591,350127129479492
VCOM§NA//660NA154NA154
WesternU/COMP1,9361,994182181702700
WVSOM 1,372
1,432
81
103
308
337
Total 36,107 39,028 3,079 3,308 11,432 11,857
 Source: American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine/American Osteopathic Association, Annual Osteopathic Medical School Questionnaire, 2003-2004 academic year.
 *Full names of colleges with abbreviations appear in the Appendix.
 Because most applicants apply to several schools, the number of applications shown in this table is significantly higher than the number of individual applicants shown in Table 1.
 New York College of Osteopathic Medicine's data include the Accelerated Program for Émigré Physicians (APEP) students.
 §The Edward Via Virginia College of Osteopathic Medicine admitted its first class in Fall 2003.
 //NA indicates not available.
×
Table 3
Total Enrollment and Percentage of Minority Ethnic Groups By College
Underrepresented Ethnic Minority Asian/Pacific Islander Total Ethmic Minority
College*
Total Enrollment
No.
Percent of Total Enrollment
No.
Percent of Total Enrollment
No.
Percent of Total Enrollment
ATSU/KCOM626121.97411.88613.7
DMU-COM795384.8354.4739.2
KCUMB-COM901515.7889.813915.4
LECOM806293.69812.212715.8
MSUCOM533285.36311.89117.1
MWU/AzCOM547152.75910.87413.5
MWU/CCOM664263.911917.914521.8
NSUCOM76911915.512916.824832.2
NYCOM1,16117114.732628.149742.8
OSU-COM3505315.1174.97020.0
OU-COM4286314.7307.09321.7
PCOM1,011919.010510.419619.4
PCSOM253104.0104.0207.9
TUCOM49091.811022.411924.3
UMDNJ-SOM3528925.38223.317148.6
UNECOM48861.2377.6438.8
UNTHSC/TCOM492438.712625.616934.3
VCOM§1541610.41711.03321.4
WesternU/COMP700537.627439.132746.7
WVSOM 337
4
1.2
23
6.8
27
8.0
All Colleges 11,857 926 7.8 1,822 15.4 2,748 32.2
 Source: American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine/American Osteopathic Association, Annual Osteopathic Medical School Questionnaire, 2003-2004 academic year.
 *Full names of colleges with abbreviations appear in the Appendix.
 These percentages are based on total enrollment. Percentages may not add across because of rounding.
 New York College of Osteopathic Medicine's data include the Accelerated Program for Émigé, Physicians (APEP) students
 §The Edward Via Virginia College of Osteopathic Medicine admitted its first class in Fall 2003
Table 3
Total Enrollment and Percentage of Minority Ethnic Groups By College
Underrepresented Ethnic Minority Asian/Pacific Islander Total Ethmic Minority
College*
Total Enrollment
No.
Percent of Total Enrollment
No.
Percent of Total Enrollment
No.
Percent of Total Enrollment
ATSU/KCOM626121.97411.88613.7
DMU-COM795384.8354.4739.2
KCUMB-COM901515.7889.813915.4
LECOM806293.69812.212715.8
MSUCOM533285.36311.89117.1
MWU/AzCOM547152.75910.87413.5
MWU/CCOM664263.911917.914521.8
NSUCOM76911915.512916.824832.2
NYCOM1,16117114.732628.149742.8
OSU-COM3505315.1174.97020.0
OU-COM4286314.7307.09321.7
PCOM1,011919.010510.419619.4
PCSOM253104.0104.0207.9
TUCOM49091.811022.411924.3
UMDNJ-SOM3528925.38223.317148.6
UNECOM48861.2377.6438.8
UNTHSC/TCOM492438.712625.616934.3
VCOM§1541610.41711.03321.4
WesternU/COMP700537.627439.132746.7
WVSOM 337
4
1.2
23
6.8
27
8.0
All Colleges 11,857 926 7.8 1,822 15.4 2,748 32.2
 Source: American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine/American Osteopathic Association, Annual Osteopathic Medical School Questionnaire, 2003-2004 academic year.
 *Full names of colleges with abbreviations appear in the Appendix.
 These percentages are based on total enrollment. Percentages may not add across because of rounding.
 New York College of Osteopathic Medicine's data include the Accelerated Program for Émigé, Physicians (APEP) students
 §The Edward Via Virginia College of Osteopathic Medicine admitted its first class in Fall 2003
×
Table 4
Total Enrollment and Enrollment of Women at Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine
Total Enrollment
Entering Year
Total
Women No. (%)
19948,1462,870 (35.2)
19958,4753,075 (36.3)
1996*8,9613,308 (36.9)
19979,4343,591 (38.1)
19989,8823,862 (39.1)
199910,3884,181 (40.2)
200010,8174,443 (41.1)
200111,1034,781 (43.1)
200211,4325,099 (44.6)
200311,8575,557 (49.9)
 Source: American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine/American Osteopathic Association, Annual Osteopathic Medical School Questionnaire, 2003-2004 academic year.
 *Data include the Accelerated Program for Émigré Physicians (APEP) at New York College of Osteopathic Medicine of New York Institute of Medicine and Midwestern University/Arizona College of Osteopathic Medicine's first class of 103, including 33 women.
 Data include Pikeville College School of Osteopathic Medicine and Touro University College of Osteopathic Medicine's first classes of 60 students (14 women) and 66 students (26 women), respectively.
 Data include Edward Via College of Osteopathic Medicine's first class of 154 students, including 74 women.
Table 4
Total Enrollment and Enrollment of Women at Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine
Total Enrollment
Entering Year
Total
Women No. (%)
19948,1462,870 (35.2)
19958,4753,075 (36.3)
1996*8,9613,308 (36.9)
19979,4343,591 (38.1)
19989,8823,862 (39.1)
199910,3884,181 (40.2)
200010,8174,443 (41.1)
200111,1034,781 (43.1)
200211,4325,099 (44.6)
200311,8575,557 (49.9)
 Source: American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine/American Osteopathic Association, Annual Osteopathic Medical School Questionnaire, 2003-2004 academic year.
 *Data include the Accelerated Program for Émigré Physicians (APEP) at New York College of Osteopathic Medicine of New York Institute of Medicine and Midwestern University/Arizona College of Osteopathic Medicine's first class of 103, including 33 women.
 Data include Pikeville College School of Osteopathic Medicine and Touro University College of Osteopathic Medicine's first classes of 60 students (14 women) and 66 students (26 women), respectively.
 Data include Edward Via College of Osteopathic Medicine's first class of 154 students, including 74 women.
×
Table 5
Number of State Residents and Nonresidents Enrolled in First Year by College
2002-2003 2003-2004
College*
No. of Residents
No. of Nonresidents
Total No.
No. of Residents
No. of Nonresidents
No. of Foreign Students
Total No.
ATSU/KCOM26139165281393170
DMU-COM52164216401640204
KCUMB-COM28200228292012232
LECOM78145223631640227
MSUCOM1195124132110143
MWU/AzCOM45109154401070147
MWU/CCOM7696172691190188
NSUCOM9791188117916214
NYCOM2071263331961151312
OSU-COM771390846090
OU-COM932111495190114
PCOM177892661491132264
PCSOM2738653342075
TUCOM666413056850141
UMDNJ-SOM83790942096
UNECOM25106131181033124
UNTHSC/TCOM123412712450129
VCOMNANANA441091154
WesternU/COMP14042182121555181
WVSOM 51
30
81
50
53
0
103
Total 1590 1489 3079 1582 1703 23 3308
 Source: American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine/American Osteopathic Association, Annual Osteopathic Medical School Questionnaire, 2003-2004 academic year.
 *Full names of colleges with abbreviations appear in the Appendix.
 Data for New York College of Osteopathic Medicine of New York Institute ot Technology includes the Accelerated Program for Émigré Physicians (APEP) students.
 NA indicates not available.
Table 5
Number of State Residents and Nonresidents Enrolled in First Year by College
2002-2003 2003-2004
College*
No. of Residents
No. of Nonresidents
Total No.
No. of Residents
No. of Nonresidents
No. of Foreign Students
Total No.
ATSU/KCOM26139165281393170
DMU-COM52164216401640204
KCUMB-COM28200228292012232
LECOM78145223631640227
MSUCOM1195124132110143
MWU/AzCOM45109154401070147
MWU/CCOM7696172691190188
NSUCOM9791188117916214
NYCOM2071263331961151312
OSU-COM771390846090
OU-COM932111495190114
PCOM177892661491132264
PCSOM2738653342075
TUCOM666413056850141
UMDNJ-SOM83790942096
UNECOM25106131181033124
UNTHSC/TCOM123412712450129
VCOMNANANA441091154
WesternU/COMP14042182121555181
WVSOM 51
30
81
50
53
0
103
Total 1590 1489 3079 1582 1703 23 3308
 Source: American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine/American Osteopathic Association, Annual Osteopathic Medical School Questionnaire, 2003-2004 academic year.
 *Full names of colleges with abbreviations appear in the Appendix.
 Data for New York College of Osteopathic Medicine of New York Institute ot Technology includes the Accelerated Program for Émigré Physicians (APEP) students.
 NA indicates not available.
×
Table 6
Full-time Faculty Assignments by Discipline
Percent of Faculty Assigned *
Discipline
2002-2003
2003-2004
□ Anatomy7.87.8
□ Biochemistry4.64.8
□ Emergency Medicine0.6
□ General Practice/Family Practice17.217.5
□ Geriatrics2.22.2
□ Internal Medicine10.310.8
□ Microbiology5.95.2
□ Neurology1.11.3
□ Obstetrics/Gynecology3.32.9
□ Osteopathic Principles & Practice5.04.3
□ Pathology3.22.9
□ Pediatrics3.63.7
□ Pharmacology4.74.1
□ Physical Medicine/Rehabilitation Medicine0.91.2
□ Physiology4.94.6
□ Preventive Medicine/Public Health2.62.4
□ Psychiatry5.25.3
□ Radiology1.11.5
□ Surgery (General)3.43.6
□ Other12.413.8
 Source: American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine/American Osteopathic Association, Annual Osteopathic Medical School Questionnaire, 2003-2004 academic year.
 *Percentages may not add to 100% because of rounding.
 Now reported under “Other”.
 Includes anesthesiology, dermatology, emergency medicine, ophthalmology, orthopedic surgery, otolaryngology, and urology.
Table 6
Full-time Faculty Assignments by Discipline
Percent of Faculty Assigned *
Discipline
2002-2003
2003-2004
□ Anatomy7.87.8
□ Biochemistry4.64.8
□ Emergency Medicine0.6
□ General Practice/Family Practice17.217.5
□ Geriatrics2.22.2
□ Internal Medicine10.310.8
□ Microbiology5.95.2
□ Neurology1.11.3
□ Obstetrics/Gynecology3.32.9
□ Osteopathic Principles & Practice5.04.3
□ Pathology3.22.9
□ Pediatrics3.63.7
□ Pharmacology4.74.1
□ Physical Medicine/Rehabilitation Medicine0.91.2
□ Physiology4.94.6
□ Preventive Medicine/Public Health2.62.4
□ Psychiatry5.25.3
□ Radiology1.11.5
□ Surgery (General)3.43.6
□ Other12.413.8
 Source: American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine/American Osteopathic Association, Annual Osteopathic Medical School Questionnaire, 2003-2004 academic year.
 *Percentages may not add to 100% because of rounding.
 Now reported under “Other”.
 Includes anesthesiology, dermatology, emergency medicine, ophthalmology, orthopedic surgery, otolaryngology, and urology.
×
Table 7
Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine Tuition (Subject to Change)
Tuition
College*
State Residents
Nonresidents
Private
ATSU/KCOM$31,700$31,700
DMU-COM$29,050$29,050
KCUMB-COM$33,247$33,247
LECOM$24,100$25,100
MWU/AzCOM$34,099$34,099
MWU/CCOM$29,755$35,391
NSUCOM$23,267$29,358
NYCOM$31,749$31,749
PCOM$32,334$32,334
PCSOM$27,000$27,000
TUCOM$30,650$30,650
UNECOM$33,000$33,000
VCOM$29,500$29,500
WesternU/COMP$33,230$33,230
Mean $30,192 $31,101

Public
MSUCOM$20,900$44,700
OSU-COM$14,995$30,144
OU-COM$19,455$28,353
UMDNJ-SOM$20,567$32,185
UNTHSC/TCOM$ 6,550$19,650
WVSOM$16,418$40,630
Mean
$16,481 $32,610
 Source: American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine, Tuition Survey for 2004-05.
 *Full names of colleges with abbreviations appear in the Appendix.
Table 7
Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine Tuition (Subject to Change)
Tuition
College*
State Residents
Nonresidents
Private
ATSU/KCOM$31,700$31,700
DMU-COM$29,050$29,050
KCUMB-COM$33,247$33,247
LECOM$24,100$25,100
MWU/AzCOM$34,099$34,099
MWU/CCOM$29,755$35,391
NSUCOM$23,267$29,358
NYCOM$31,749$31,749
PCOM$32,334$32,334
PCSOM$27,000$27,000
TUCOM$30,650$30,650
UNECOM$33,000$33,000
VCOM$29,500$29,500
WesternU/COMP$33,230$33,230
Mean $30,192 $31,101

Public
MSUCOM$20,900$44,700
OSU-COM$14,995$30,144
OU-COM$19,455$28,353
UMDNJ-SOM$20,567$32,185
UNTHSC/TCOM$ 6,550$19,650
WVSOM$16,418$40,630
Mean
$16,481 $32,610
 Source: American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine, Tuition Survey for 2004-05.
 *Full names of colleges with abbreviations appear in the Appendix.
×