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Review  |   July 2003
Treating patients in primary care: the impact of mood, behavior, and thought disturbances
Article Information
Pediatrics / Preventive Medicine / Psychiatry
Review   |   July 2003
Treating patients in primary care: the impact of mood, behavior, and thought disturbances
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, July 2003, Vol. 103, 319-329. doi:10.7556/jaoa.2003.103.7.319
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, July 2003, Vol. 103, 319-329. doi:10.7556/jaoa.2003.103.7.319
Abstract

Patients with symptoms of mood, behavior, and thought disturbances are regularly treated in the primary care setting. More often than not, the disorders associated with these symptoms are overlooked or misdiagnosed by physicians, in part because these patients present symptomatic complaints that are seemingly unrelated to the underlying disorder. Recognition of comorbid psychiatric symptoms allows physicians to treat the whole person more effectively. Furthermore, patients and their caregivers benefit greatly from the early intervention and treatment that is frequently provided in the primary care setting. With the appropriate training so that they may readily recognize these symptoms, osteopathic physicians can help prevent the further progression of--or potential unfavorable outcomes from--otherwise untreated or inadequately treated illnesses.