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Letters to the Editor  |   October 2004
DO Outlines Steps to Malpractice Reform
Author Affiliations
  • Roger G. Michaud, DO
    Foster, Rhode Island
Article Information
Professional Issues
Letters to the Editor   |   October 2004
DO Outlines Steps to Malpractice Reform
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, October 2004, Vol. 104, 404-405. doi:10.7556/jaoa.2004.104.10.404
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, October 2004, Vol. 104, 404-405. doi:10.7556/jaoa.2004.104.10.404
To the Editor:  
Recently, I contributed toward the cause of the Osteopathic Political Action Committee (OPAC) in Washington, DC, with the following reservations: 
  • The message put forth by OPAC must reach a wider audience than just DOs. Osteopathic physicians understand many of the issues, yet the American Osteopathic Association still hesitates to challenge a segment of trial lawyers and their physicians who testify for plaintiff's counsel without accountability. Where is the American Medical Association in all this? Does that organization approve their physicians generating income this way? Before trial, these attorneys move the judge to limit information from the medical records that can be presented to the jury. The collaborating physician then bases his testimony and opinion to the jury solely on this limited information.
  • The Osteopathic Political Action Committee must support intellectually honest and thoughtful candidates on both the state and national levels. Most Democrat and Republican candidates depend heavily on their political action committees' ability for rhetoric and for raising money. Do money or action speak louder than words? Look outside the usual two-party system of candidates.
  • The media slant on malpractice reform must be put in check. Insist on live, one-on-one interviews—whether for minute-long or half-hour segments. This will promote clarity and an emphasis on the issues.
There is much to do. These ideas give some idea of the magnitude.