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Original Contribution  |   December 2003
Primary care physicians' attitudes and practices regarding complementary and alternative medicine
Article Information
Pediatrics / Psychiatry
Original Contribution   |   December 2003
Primary care physicians' attitudes and practices regarding complementary and alternative medicine
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, December 2003, Vol. 103, 597-602. doi:10.7556/jaoa.2003.103.12.597
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, December 2003, Vol. 103, 597-602. doi:10.7556/jaoa.2003.103.12.597
Abstract

Data were gathered from 423 osteopathic primary care physicians who are members of the Michigan Osteopathic Association, assessing their attitudes and practices regarding complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). Family physicians and general internists were more likely than pediatricians to talk to their patients about CAM. Similarly, female physicians were more likely than male physicians to talk to their patients about CAM or refer their patients for CAM. Finally, physicians aged 35 years and younger were more likely than those 60 years and older to use CAM for themselves or their families. Predominant among the conditions for which the physicians would refer for CAM were long-term problems, traditional therapy failures, psychiatric disorders, and behavioral problems. Results reveal wide variations in the way osteopathic primary care physicians view and use complementary and alternative care.