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Review  |   August 2002
Clinical experience with pneumococcal conjugate vaccines in infants and children
Article Information
Pediatrics / Preventive Medicine
Review   |   August 2002
Clinical experience with pneumococcal conjugate vaccines in infants and children
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, August 2002, Vol. 102, 431-436. doi:10.7556/jaoa.2002.102.8.431
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, August 2002, Vol. 102, 431-436. doi:10.7556/jaoa.2002.102.8.431
Abstract

Streptococcus pneumoniae is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in pediatric patients, particularly in infants and children younger than 2 years. Each year, S pneumoniae is responsible for significant morbidity and mortality in the United States. During the past several decades, the emergence of penicillin-nonsusceptible and multidrug-resistant pneumococcal isolates has become a major cause for concern, with the overuse or inappropriate use of antibiotics playing a significant role in the increase of resistance. Because the resistance of S pneumoniae to antibiotics has complicated the treatment of pneumococcal infections, attention has focused on the need to prevent disease through vaccination. The objective of this article is to describe the rationale for the development of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines and to summarize the clinical experience to date with these vaccines in infants and children.