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Clinical Practice  |   May 2002
Joint cracking and popping: understanding noises that accompany articular release
Article Information
Neuromusculoskeletal Disorders / Arthritis
Clinical Practice   |   May 2002
Joint cracking and popping: understanding noises that accompany articular release
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, May 2002, Vol. 102, 283-287. doi:10.7556/jaoa.2002.102.5.283
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, May 2002, Vol. 102, 283-287. doi:10.7556/jaoa.2002.102.5.283
Abstract

Articular release is a physiologic event that may or may not be audible. It is seen in patients with healthy joints as well as those with somatic dysfunction. After an articular release, there is a difference in joint spacing-with the release increasing the distance between articular surfaces. Not all noise that emanates from a joint signifies an articular release. A hypothesis about the noise that frequently accompanies this release is offered and includes anatomic, physiologic, and functional models of articular release. Repeated performance of articular release may decrease the occurrence of arthritis. Potential problems from repeated articular release (eg, hypermobility) are also examined.