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Case Report  |   January 2002
Symptoms associated with anthrax exposure: suspected "aborted" anthrax
Article Information
Disaster Medicine
Case Report   |   January 2002
Symptoms associated with anthrax exposure: suspected "aborted" anthrax
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, January 2002, Vol. 102, 41-43. doi:10.7556/jaoa.2002.102.1.41
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, January 2002, Vol. 102, 41-43. doi:10.7556/jaoa.2002.102.1.41
Abstract

Anthrax is a naturally occurring organism with a low incidence of infection. There are no known cases of human-to-human transmission. Bioterrorism-related anthrax in the United States has been seen in three high-risk groups: (1) postal workers, (2) politicians and their staffs, and (3) the press. It appears as though the bioterrorism-related anthrax cases of fall 2001 have been transmitted through the US Postal Service. The authors present a case in which a person at high risk for anthrax exposure was inadequately treated and had symptoms that do not fall into any specific category of disease. It emphasizes the need for someone who has been started on prophylaxis for anthrax to complete a full 60-day course of treatment. It also shows the effectiveness of antibiotic therapy, even in those with high exposure to weaponized anthrax. Further, we would like to suggest that there may exist a new clinical entity of "aborted anthrax infection."