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Medical Education  |   July 2001
Student perceptions of osteopathic manipulative treatment after completing a manipulative medicine rotation
Article Information
Medical Education / Osteopathic Manipulative Treatment
Medical Education   |   July 2001
Student perceptions of osteopathic manipulative treatment after completing a manipulative medicine rotation
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, July 2001, Vol. 101, 395-400. doi:10.7556/jaoa.2001.101.7.395
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, July 2001, Vol. 101, 395-400. doi:10.7556/jaoa.2001.101.7.395
Abstract

Recent studies have demonstrated a decline in the use of osteopathic manipulative treatment (OMT) by osteopathic physicians, reflecting a trend that may begin in medical school. The authors used a questionnaire to examine the teaching and use of OMT in five rotations and the perceptions of 86 graduating osteopathic medical students of their experiences following their core manipulative medicine rotation. Most students indicated that they applied osteopathic principles sometimes (39.5%) or often (29.1%) during rotations. Forty-three percent of students rated their ability to apply osteopathic principles as average. The number of students who indicated that they rarely used OMT during their rotations was 31 (36.0%) for internal medicine, 21 (24.4%) for surgery, 23 (26.7%) for pediatrics, and 24 (27.9%) for obstetrics/gynecology. When asked why OMT was not used during a rotation, 47.2% of respondents cited time constraints, and 21.7% stated that their attending physicians discouraged the use of OMT. These results demonstrate a distinction between students' perceived level of osteopathic principles and skills and their application during clinical rotations.