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Original Contribution  |   March 2000
Physician awareness of domestic violence: does continuing medical education have an impact?
Article Information
Medical Education
Original Contribution   |   March 2000
Physician awareness of domestic violence: does continuing medical education have an impact?
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, March 2000, Vol. 100, 145-148. doi:10.7556/jaoa.2000.100.3.145
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, March 2000, Vol. 100, 145-148. doi:10.7556/jaoa.2000.100.3.145
Abstract

One hundred currently practicing physicians were surveyed regarding screening and management of domestic violence to determine whether mandatory continuing medical education (CME) is likely to increase awareness of and response to domestic violence. The authors surveyed 25 family physicians and 25 obstetrician/gynecologists in each of two states, Florida and New Jersey. In addition, they polled 26 family practice residents in the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey-School of Osteopathic Medicine program. Practices with a female physician were four times more likely to screen for domestic violence than practices with all male physicians. No difference existed in screening between family physicians and obstetrician/gynecologists; physicians in Florida and those in New Jersey; or attending physicians and family practice residents. Findings indicate that Florida's mandatory CME law does not appear to have made an impact on the management of domestic violence. Practices with a female physician were more likely to screen for domestic violence.